Category Archives: Women’s and Children’s

21 March 2017

Three Breakthrough Technologies That Will Change Medicine

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) publishes an annual list of 10 Breakthrough Technologies. Three innovations from this year’s list promise to have a dramatic impact on the future of medicine.

Brain Implants that Reverse the Effects of Paralysis

In recent years, brain implants have enabled lab animals and even a few people to use thoughts to control computer cursors or robotic arms. According to the 2017 MIT report,  researchers are “taking a significant next step toward reversing paralysis once and for all” using what French neuroscientist Grégoire Courtine calls a “neural bypass.” Wireless implants transmit electrical impulses from brain to spinal cord, bypassing...

14 March 2017

Newly ID’d Genomic Features of Cervical Cancer May Allow Targeted Therapies

Once known as the leading cause of cancer deaths for women in the United States, cervical cancer has been on the decline due to advances in detection technology and medical treatments over the last four decades. The latest example of this trend is a recent study by investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network, which has identified novel genomic and molecular characteristics of cervical cancer that may aid in the creation of more targeted, effective drug therapies.

Through an analysis of the genomes of 178 primary cervical cancers, TCGA researchers found that more than 70 percent of cervical tumors had genomic alterations in one or both of two important cell signaling pathway. Further,...

9 March 2017

NICU Clinical Trial Studies Probiotics Use to Prevent NEC

Sheridan Clinical Research is participating in a multicentered, randomized, double-blind clinical trial using an Investigational probiotic for the prevention of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in premature infants. The research is sponsored by Sigma-Tau Pharmaceuticals, Inc.  Sheridan’s NICU Medical Director Mitchell Stern, MD, is the Principal Investigator for the Phase Ib/IIa trial being conducted at Plantation General Hospital in Plantation, Florida, to study the safety and efficacy of once-daily dosing of STP206 in premature very low birth weight (VLBW) and extremely low birth weight (ELBW) neonates to decrease the incidence of NEC.

NEC is the most common serious acquired disease of the gastrointestinal...

21 February 2017

Research Recommends Continued Breast Cancer Screening Mammography for Older Women

New research about the appropriate age limit for breast cancer mammography screenings, presented at the Radiological Society of North America’s annual meeting late last year, challenges current conventional recommendations. While the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that women undergo screenings every two years until age 74, researchers from the University of California at San Francisco assert this age limit may be arbitrary after finding that the precision of breast cancer mammography screening, and thus the rate of cancer detection, increases significantly as women age.

Pulling from the American College of Radiology National Mammography Database, the research team examined 5.7 million...

16 February 2017

No Link Between Maternal Influenza and Increased Autism Risk for Children

Current research by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affects about 1 in 68 children in the United States. While the exact causes for ASD are not yet known, previous and now widely discredited scientific research contributed to the popular belief that vaccinations can cause the disorder. Despite new research that increasingly disproves any potential link, this belief continues to linger. To further investigate a possible connection, a recent study published in JAMA Pediatrics examined the association between maternal influenza vaccination during pregnancy and an increased risk of ASD for children.

For this cohort study, researchers from Kaiser Permanente...

7 February 2017

Grand Strand Medical Center Adds Neonatology Program

Grand Stand Medical Center in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina has launched a new neonatology program that has been in the works for about a year. The hospital is working to recruit two permanent, local neonatologists. Until those positions can be filled, neonatologists from other counties in South Carolina are working at the hospital, making Grand Stand Medical Center the only hospital in Horry County to have a neonatologist either in the hospital or on-call at all times.

Dr. Art Shepard, the Sheridan neonatologist who worked on staff at the hospital during the first week of the new program, told local ABC News affiliate WPDE that the hospital delivers about 1,000 babies a year, and that 8-10 percent of all babies need...

31 January 2017

Learning Health System (LHS) Pilot Saved Nationwide Children’s Hospital $1.36 Million in 12 Months

Researchers from Nationwide Children's Hospital and The Ohio State University (OSU) found that a learning health system (LHS) pilot program at Nationwide combining tailored electronic health records system entry, care coordinators and evidence-based clinical data and research reduced total inpatient days by 43%, reduced inpatient admission by 27%, reduced ER visits by 30% and reduced urgent care visits by 29% during the first year. Per a recent article in HealthLeaders Media, those reductions generated an impressive $1.36 million savings in health care costs during the 12-month period in 2010 and 2011.

The National Academy of Medicine’s Learning Health System Series defines a learning health system...

24 January 2017

Strategies to Provide Neuroprotection for Preterm Infants

Neuroprotection for preterm infants can be one of the most important aspects of care provided to preterm neonates, yet it is sometimes overlooked because the providers are focused on other health issues. It is also essential that neuroprotection for preterm infants be done correctly to avoid causing lifelong struggles for both the babies and their families. A recent article in Neonatal Network, “Neuroprotection of the Preterm Infant,” co-authored by Sheridan Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) and Neonatal Nurse Practitioner (NNP) Abby Kaspar, offers simple strategies that providers and nurses can use to provide effective neuroprotection for premature infants.

The article defines neuroprotection as...

19 January 2017

Integrating Telemedicine Responsibly

Providers and patients alike view telemedicine as an increasingly important healthcare delivery modality. Per a recent article in Medical Economics, “How to balance telemedicine advances with ethics,” the American Telemedicine Association (ATA) reports that more than half of all U.S. hospitals use some form of telemedicine; and IHS Technology predicts the number of patients using telehealth services will jump from fewer than 350,000 in 2013 to 7 million in 2018.

But this modality can also be challenging to implement responsibly.

Telehealth Benefits

The dramatic growth of telemedicine is driven by its ability to further the goals of the “quadruple aim” framework for...

17 January 2017

Study Identifies Risk Factors for Congenital Heart Disease in Infants

A study in the Canadian Medical Association Journal identified the chronic conditions that may predispose women to give birth to infants with congenital heart disease, also known as congenital heart defects or CHD.

The study reviewed the Taiwan Maternal and Child Health Database’s records of 1,387,650 live births from 2004 to 2010. The researchers investigated three data sets including:

Birth Registrations data on the sociodemographic characteristics of live births Birth Notifications data on prenatal care and the lifestyles of pregnant women Medical claims data from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance program

The researchers found that...