Category Archives: Women’s and Children’s

26 April 2017

Doctors Recommend a Pause Before Cutting the Umbilical Cord

In the first moments of a newborn’s life, obstetricians make multiple crucial decisions to provide optimal medical care. One of those decisions is the right time to cut the umbilical cord. While it has traditionally been cut immediately after birth to quickly clean and deliver the newborn to its expecting parents, the health care community has started to rethink this age-old practice. The latest official change in thinking has come from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), which recently recommended that obstetricians wait at least 30 to 60 seconds before cutting the umbilical cord, as reported by The New York Times.

Even before the ACOG released the new recommendations, many...

19 April 2017

Google’s AI Could Help Pathologists Identify Breast Cancer Better, Faster

According to the CDC, there are more than 230,000 people diagnosed with breast cancer in the U.S. each year.  For these patients, determination of whether cancer cells have metastasized to other parts of the body significantly influences decisions about treatment.

While a pathologist’s report is generally considered the gold standard in the diagnosis of cancer, reviewing diagnostic slides is an extremely complicated task, even for specialists with years of training and experience. Different pathologists can arrive at variable diagnoses for the same patient, which can result in misdiagnoses. Diagnostic agreement for some forms of breast cancer can be as low as 48%. That number is unsurprising, considering the...

11 April 2017

Pediatric Vaccine Recommendations Updated for 2017

In a recent joint report, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) have released the recommended childhood and adolescent immunization schedules for 2017. While immunization schedules are typically updated annually, medical professionals view some of the recent schedule updates as significant changes for pediatricians. Influenced by new trends in nationwide adolescent health, notable changes to the recommendations include:

1. Adolescents should no longer be given the live attenuated influenza vaccine. Flu-related hospitalizations and deaths have spiked nationwide since the start of the 2016–2017 flu season. Children younger...

28 March 2017

Northside Team Saves Mother, Baby in Complicated Delivery

Air Force major Jerry Gay and his pregnant wife, Mary, were looking forward to the expected February 9 arrival of their new daughter. Mary was at home in Georgia and Jerry was deployed in Qatar, in the Middle East. But the couple’s joy became tempered with fear when Mary’s ob-gyn, Dr. Alex Eaccarino, noticed a spot that didn’t look quite normal during Mary’s 30-week checkup, per a recent story on Fox 5 Atlanta. 

The spot turned out to be uterine scarring from Mary’s prior cesarean-section deliveries. The scarring increased her risk for a placenta accreta, a potentially life-threatening obstetric condition that occurs when part or all of the placenta invades the uterine wall and is...

21 March 2017

Three Breakthrough Technologies That Will Change Medicine

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) publishes an annual list of 10 Breakthrough Technologies. Three innovations from this year’s list promise to have a dramatic impact on the future of medicine.

Brain Implants that Reverse the Effects of Paralysis

In recent years, brain implants have enabled lab animals and even a few people to use thoughts to control computer cursors or robotic arms. According to the 2017 MIT report,  researchers are “taking a significant next step toward reversing paralysis once and for all” using what French neuroscientist Grégoire Courtine calls a “neural bypass.” Wireless implants transmit electrical impulses from brain to spinal cord, bypassing...

14 March 2017

Newly ID’d Genomic Features of Cervical Cancer May Allow Targeted Therapies

Once known as the leading cause of cancer deaths for women in the United States, cervical cancer has been on the decline due to advances in detection technology and medical treatments over the last four decades. The latest example of this trend is a recent study by investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network, which has identified novel genomic and molecular characteristics of cervical cancer that may aid in the creation of more targeted, effective drug therapies.

Through an analysis of the genomes of 178 primary cervical cancers, TCGA researchers found that more than 70 percent of cervical tumors had genomic alterations in one or both of two important cell signaling pathway. Further,...

9 March 2017

NICU Clinical Trial Studies Probiotics Use to Prevent NEC

Sheridan Clinical Research is participating in a multicentered, randomized, double-blind clinical trial using an Investigational probiotic for the prevention of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in premature infants. The research is sponsored by Sigma-Tau Pharmaceuticals, Inc.  Sheridan’s NICU Medical Director Mitchell Stern, MD, is the Principal Investigator for the Phase Ib/IIa trial being conducted at Plantation General Hospital in Plantation, Florida, to study the safety and efficacy of once-daily dosing of STP206 in premature very low birth weight (VLBW) and extremely low birth weight (ELBW) neonates to decrease the incidence of NEC.

NEC is the most common serious acquired disease of the gastrointestinal...

21 February 2017

Research Recommends Continued Breast Cancer Screening Mammography for Older Women

New research about the appropriate age limit for breast cancer mammography screenings, presented at the Radiological Society of North America’s annual meeting late last year, challenges current conventional recommendations. While the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that women undergo screenings every two years until age 74, researchers from the University of California at San Francisco assert this age limit may be arbitrary after finding that the precision of breast cancer mammography screening, and thus the rate of cancer detection, increases significantly as women age.

Pulling from the American College of Radiology National Mammography Database, the research team examined 5.7 million...

16 February 2017

No Link Between Maternal Influenza and Increased Autism Risk for Children

Current research by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affects about 1 in 68 children in the United States. While the exact causes for ASD are not yet known, previous and now widely discredited scientific research contributed to the popular belief that vaccinations can cause the disorder. Despite new research that increasingly disproves any potential link, this belief continues to linger. To further investigate a possible connection, a recent study published in JAMA Pediatrics examined the association between maternal influenza vaccination during pregnancy and an increased risk of ASD for children.

For this cohort study, researchers from Kaiser Permanente...

7 February 2017

Grand Strand Medical Center Adds Neonatology Program

Grand Stand Medical Center in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina has launched a new neonatology program that has been in the works for about a year. The hospital is working to recruit two permanent, local neonatologists. Until those positions can be filled, neonatologists from other counties in South Carolina are working at the hospital, making Grand Stand Medical Center the only hospital in Horry County to have a neonatologist either in the hospital or on-call at all times.

Dr. Art Shepard, the Sheridan neonatologist who worked on staff at the hospital during the first week of the new program, told local ABC News affiliate WPDE that the hospital delivers about 1,000 babies a year, and that 8-10 percent of all babies need...