Category Archives: Technology

21 March 2017

Three Breakthrough Technologies That Will Change Medicine

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) publishes an annual list of 10 Breakthrough Technologies. Three innovations from this year’s list promise to have a dramatic impact on the future of medicine.

Brain Implants that Reverse the Effects of Paralysis

In recent years, brain implants have enabled lab animals and even a few people to use thoughts to control computer cursors or robotic arms. According to the 2017 MIT report,  researchers are “taking a significant next step toward reversing paralysis once and for all” using what French neuroscientist Grégoire Courtine calls a “neural bypass.” Wireless implants transmit electrical impulses from brain to spinal cord, bypassing...

7 March 2017

CDC Opioid Guideline App: A Valuable Prescribing Tool

Last March, the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published the “CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain.” The document provides recommendations for appropriate prescribing of opioid pain relievers and other treatment options in order to improve pain management and patient safety. Recently, the agency launched the CDC Opioid Prescribing Guideline Mobile App to educate providers and inform clinical decision-making when prescribing opioids outside of active cancer treatment, palliative care and end-of-life care. This free mobile app puts the opioid prescribing guideline and other helpful content, tools and resources into prescribers’ palms at the point of...

2 March 2017

ID Genomics IDs UTIs and Best Antibiotics in 25-45 Minutes

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common hospital-acquired infections in the U.S. UTIs can be quite painful, and since it usually it takes a lab about two to three days to identify the specific bacteria causing a patient’s infection, most doctors don’t want to wait that long to treat it. Instead, they make an educated guess as to which antibiotic to administer. Given that approximately 80 percent of UTIs are caused by E. coli bacteria, there’s a good chance the physician will choose an appropriate antibiotic. But that means that 20 percent of those patients may receive an ineffective or non-optimal antibiotic. And even if E. coli is the culprit, an increasing number of E....

14 February 2017

Virtual Coaching for Patient Engagement

A recent study published in the American Journal of Managed Care found that patients who used “virtual health coach” (VHC) technology while waiting for their physicians in the exam room were encouraged to engage in conversation with their physicians about a healthy lifestyle topic that was not discussed during previous appointments. 

Eighty-nine patients who agreed to test out “new technology” during their exam room downtime were given handheld tablet computers equipped with virtual health coaches driven by artificial intelligence (AI) and natural language understanding (NLU) technologies, similar to Apple’s Siri or Google’s Alexa. The patients interacted with an...

2 February 2017

Making it Easy for Patients to Read Their Doctors’ Notes

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) gives patients the right to inspect, review, and receive a copy of their medical records, including doctor’s notes, held by health plans and health care providers. Accessing those records can take time and the process can be a hassle, so most patients don’t bother. Yet patients often have a hard time remembering the details of their medical diagnoses and care instructions after leaving the doctor’s office, especially when there is a complex diagnosis, stressful news, or when the patient has cognitive issues. Electronic health records (EHRs) enable doctors to share their notes with patients the push of a button. Most health systems and...

31 January 2017

Learning Health System (LHS) Pilot Saved Nationwide Children’s Hospital $1.36 Million in 12 Months

Researchers from Nationwide Children's Hospital and The Ohio State University (OSU) found that a learning health system (LHS) pilot program at Nationwide combining tailored electronic health records system entry, care coordinators and evidence-based clinical data and research reduced total inpatient days by 43%, reduced inpatient admission by 27%, reduced ER visits by 30% and reduced urgent care visits by 29% during the first year. Per a recent article in HealthLeaders Media, those reductions generated an impressive $1.36 million savings in health care costs during the 12-month period in 2010 and 2011.

The National Academy of Medicine’s Learning Health System Series defines a learning health system...

19 January 2017

Integrating Telemedicine Responsibly

Providers and patients alike view telemedicine as an increasingly important healthcare delivery modality. Per a recent article in Medical Economics, “How to balance telemedicine advances with ethics,” the American Telemedicine Association (ATA) reports that more than half of all U.S. hospitals use some form of telemedicine; and IHS Technology predicts the number of patients using telehealth services will jump from fewer than 350,000 in 2013 to 7 million in 2018.

But this modality can also be challenging to implement responsibly.

Telehealth Benefits

The dramatic growth of telemedicine is driven by its ability to further the goals of the “quadruple aim” framework for...

5 January 2017

Our 10 Most Popular Blog Posts of 2016

The most-read posts on the Sheridan blog in 2016 focused on key topics – ranging from the challenges involved in the transition to value-based care and this country’s physician burnout epidemic to exciting technology innovations and trends in clinical practice.

The 10 most popular posts from the past year are:

How to Manage the Burdens of Change on Physicians and Health Care Practitioners, a summary of Chief Quality Officer Dr. Gerald Maccioli’s presentation at the 2016 Health:Further Summit about the overwhelming burdens on providers created by current and planned changes to the U.S. health care landscape and strategies for managing them.

Sheridan’s 2016 Leadership...

22 December 2016

Practice Management Changes in 2017

A new Physicians Practice article, “7 Predictions for Practice Management in 2017,” features several respected healthcare experts including Sheridan’s Chief Quality Officer, Gerald A. Maccioli, MD, MBA, FCCM. Their predictions addressed seven areas of anticipated change:

The Affordable Care Act and congressional action New data and deadlines Shifting payments Added regulation Changing insurance scene Technology demands Patient communication

Dr. Maccioli spoke about the modifications to the phase-in year of MACRA made by CMS to address the physician community’s “angst” about the program’s implementation, including technology and operational issues such...

8 December 2016

McLaren Hospital’s CEO Discusses the Value of Sheridan’s Distributed Radiology Services

When William “Bill” Lawrence became CEO of McLaren Central Michigan Hospital eight years ago, he saw no significant clinical issues with the three-physician radiology group at the 118-bed acute-care hospital, per a new article in Radiology Today. He did, however, find problems typical of a hospital that size: slow turnaround times, lack of consistency and significant gaps in the radiology services and modalities offered. Lawrence turned to an old friend, radiology leader Frank Seidelmann, D.O., to ask for his thoughts on solutions that could improve McLaren’s radiology services at a reasonable cost. 

Both men had worked at the renowned Cleveland Clinic and had known each other for many...