Category Archives: Emergency

12 January 2017

Research Suggests Discussing Opioid Risks With Patients Reduces Misuse

Patients who were counseled by their physicians about the long-term risks of abusing prescription opioid pills were significantly less likely to save those medications – a high-risk abuse behavior – according to a research brief published in the November/December 2016 issue of Annals of Family Medicine. 

The researchers analyzed data from two April 2015 random-digit-dial telephone surveys, both conducted by the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health and The Boston Globe, of adults 18 and older. One survey targeted Massachusetts residents; the other was national in scope. The researchers restricted their analysis to data from respondents who reported having been prescribed...

10 January 2017

Retail Clinics Near EDs Do Not Decrease Low-Acuity ED Visits

The opening of retail clinics within a 10-minute drive of emergency departments (EDs) has not resulted in reduced ED utilization for low-acuity conditions such as influenza, urinary tract infections and earaches, according to a recent study by RAND Corporation researchers. The study was published in the Annals of Emergency Medicine, the peer-reviewed scientific journal for the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP).

The findings contradict the assertions of some healthcare experts and policymakers that increasing the number of retail clinics could reduce ED visits by patients with low-acuity conditions. The study notes that about 13.7% of all emergency department visits are for low-acuity...

5 January 2017

Our 10 Most Popular Blog Posts of 2016

The most-read posts on the Sheridan blog in 2016 focused on key topics – ranging from the challenges involved in the transition to value-based care and this country’s physician burnout epidemic to exciting technology innovations and trends in clinical practice.

The 10 most popular posts from the past year are:

How to Manage the Burdens of Change on Physicians and Health Care Practitioners, a summary of Chief Quality Officer Dr. Gerald Maccioli’s presentation at the 2016 Health:Further Summit about the overwhelming burdens on providers created by current and planned changes to the U.S. health care landscape and strategies for managing them.

Sheridan’s 2016 Leadership...

15 December 2016

U.S. Surgeon General Calls for Action on the Opioid Crisis

Opioid abuse remains a devastating public health concern, and the health care community has grappled with its role in the crisis and medical professionals’ responsibility to patients struggling with substance use. U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy has responded with a report released last month analyzing the current opioid crisis and providing several recommendations for treating and preventing substance use disorders. These recommendations include:

1. Eliminate stigma

Misconceptions and negative judgments about people with substance use disorder abound, and the report stresses that even medical professionals are not immune to seeing addiction as a “moral failing or character...

13 December 2016

Five Key Strategies for Driving Change in the OR

Now more than ever, hospitals and ambulatory surgery centers are seeking anesthesia partners capable of driving positive change in their operating rooms. However, for many anesthesia providers, there are hurdles that must be overcome before such change can be realized.

Anesthesia groups of any size, regardless of their financial strength, can employ proven strategies to ensure the success of facility-wide patient care improvement initiatives. Here are five such strategies that Dr. Adam Blomberg, Sheridan’s national education director, has found to be effective.

Collaborate with nursing and surgeons on incremental steps toward larger improvements

Securing the buy-in of nursing and surgical staff is...

22 November 2016

Getting Creative with Emergency Room Care Starts with the Human Element

There is a new authority ruling emergency rooms across San Diego County, created to combat the influx of patients overwhelming the health care system in recent years. Known as “bed czars” and “zoomer nurses,” as featured in the San Diego Union-Tribune, medical personnel at Sharp Grossmont Hospital and Tri-City Medical Center monitor the ED and help make decisions to “fast track” patient care. They determine the patients with minor medical problems and allow them to remain for treatment and discharge, while patients with more severe conditions requiring at minimum an overnight stay are quickly transferred to the appropriate department.

The creation of these new positions...

10 November 2016

Online Symptom Checkers List Correct Diagnosis First Only One-Third of the Time

Patients increasingly rely on online sources of medical information, including WebMD and Google. Patients’ increasing engagement in their healthcare is a good thing, but they often come in with an incorrect diagnosis based on online research, as Dr. Catherine Polera, Chief Medical Officer for Sheridan’s Emergency Services division explained in a MedPage Today article. Now physicians can show their patients concrete evidence that a doctor’s diagnosis is far more likely to be correct than that of a computer algorithm.

Researchers at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston recently tested the diagnostic accuracy of trained physicians compared to that of online...

24 October 2016

Using CRM and Time-Outs to Focus Hurried OR Teams on Patient Safety

The shift to value-based care and the imminent implementation of MACRA have made efficiency healthcare’s new mantra, and U.S. hospitals and healthcare systems have made operating rooms a high-priority target for optimization. ORs in U.S. hospitals generate about 70% of a hospital’s revenues and operate at a staffed-capacity utilization of 60-70% and OR time costs roughly $80 an hour, so it’s not surprising that metrics like on-time starts, turnover times, same-day cancellations and OR under- and overutilization are under scrutiny. But speed is not the same thing as efficiency, and the faster OR teams work, the greater the risk of something going wrong. 

Dr. Adam Blomberg, National Education...

19 October 2016

Sheridan’s 2016 Leadership Conference Recognizes Eight Outstanding Clinical Leaders

The annual three-day Sheridan Leadership Conference is Sheridan Leadership Academy’s flagship event. This year’s conference took place Sept. 30-Oct. 2 in Orlando, Florida and was attended by nearly 600 physician and allied health leaders. 

 

Strengthening the Core

President of Physician Services Robert Coward and CEO Chris Holden provided opening remarks and introduced this year’s conference theme, “Strengthening the Core,” which focused on the key attributes required to succeed as a Sheridan clinical leader. Throughout the conference, each service line held multiple breakout sessions to promote discussion and knowledge sharing of topics related to the...

15 August 2016

Six Physician Communication Strategies to Increase Patient Engagement and Improve Outcomes

Effective physician-patient communication that builds trust and a shared sense of responsibility for the patient’s care is an increasingly important skill for physicians. Doctors whose communication fosters patient engagement has been linked to a wide range of benefits, from increased patient satisfaction, trust and higher quality of care to better patient adherence to treatment and improved physical outcomes. Communication skills are especially important in a hospital setting, which patients often perceive as more impersonal than a visit to their primary care physician’s office.

The challenge is that while the need to involve patients in decisions about their own care continues to grow in importance, the...