Category Archives: Emergency

16 March 2017

New FDA-Approved Drug Proven Effective in Reducing Recurrent C. diff Infections

Among the healthcare associated infections that may arise during a patient’s hospitalization, Clostridium difficile is an especially dangerous ailment due to its easy dissemination and antibiotic resistance. Transmission may occur if medical staff touch surfaces contaminated with feces during and between treatment of patients. The few available antibiotics that can be used to treat the initial infection do not prevent its recurrence in about 20 percent of those affected. To improve the efficacy of current standard-of-care antibiotic treatments, the healthcare community has long sought after an antibiotic that will further reduce the rate of C. diff infection recurrence. According to a study published in...

9 March 2017

NICU Clinical Trial Studies Probiotics Use to Prevent NEC

Sheridan Clinical Research is participating in a multicentered, randomized, double-blind clinical trial using an Investigational probiotic for the prevention of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in premature infants. The research is sponsored by Sigma-Tau Pharmaceuticals, Inc.  Sheridan’s NICU Medical Director Mitchell Stern, MD, is the Principal Investigator for the Phase Ib/IIa trial being conducted at Plantation General Hospital in Plantation, Florida, to study the safety and efficacy of once-daily dosing of STP206 in premature very low birth weight (VLBW) and extremely low birth weight (ELBW) neonates to decrease the incidence of NEC.

NEC is the most common serious acquired disease of the gastrointestinal...

7 March 2017

CDC Opioid Guideline App: A Valuable Prescribing Tool

Last March, the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published the “CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain.” The document provides recommendations for appropriate prescribing of opioid pain relievers and other treatment options in order to improve pain management and patient safety. Recently, the agency launched the CDC Opioid Prescribing Guideline Mobile App to educate providers and inform clinical decision-making when prescribing opioids outside of active cancer treatment, palliative care and end-of-life care. This free mobile app puts the opioid prescribing guideline and other helpful content, tools and resources into prescribers’ palms at the point of...

2 March 2017

ID Genomics IDs UTIs and Best Antibiotics in 25-45 Minutes

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common hospital-acquired infections in the U.S. UTIs can be quite painful, and since it usually it takes a lab about two to three days to identify the specific bacteria causing a patient’s infection, most doctors don’t want to wait that long to treat it. Instead, they make an educated guess as to which antibiotic to administer. Given that approximately 80 percent of UTIs are caused by E. coli bacteria, there’s a good chance the physician will choose an appropriate antibiotic. But that means that 20 percent of those patients may receive an ineffective or non-optimal antibiotic. And even if E. coli is the culprit, an increasing number of E....

7 February 2017

Grand Strand Medical Center Adds Neonatology Program

Grand Stand Medical Center in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina has launched a new neonatology program that has been in the works for about a year. The hospital is working to recruit two permanent, local neonatologists. Until those positions can be filled, neonatologists from other counties in South Carolina are working at the hospital, making Grand Stand Medical Center the only hospital in Horry County to have a neonatologist either in the hospital or on-call at all times.

Dr. Art Shepard, the Sheridan neonatologist who worked on staff at the hospital during the first week of the new program, told local ABC News affiliate WPDE that the hospital delivers about 1,000 babies a year, and that 8-10 percent of all babies need...

31 January 2017

Learning Health System (LHS) Pilot Saved Nationwide Children’s Hospital $1.36 Million in 12 Months

Researchers from Nationwide Children's Hospital and The Ohio State University (OSU) found that a learning health system (LHS) pilot program at Nationwide combining tailored electronic health records system entry, care coordinators and evidence-based clinical data and research reduced total inpatient days by 43%, reduced inpatient admission by 27%, reduced ER visits by 30% and reduced urgent care visits by 29% during the first year. Per a recent article in HealthLeaders Media, those reductions generated an impressive $1.36 million savings in health care costs during the 12-month period in 2010 and 2011.

The National Academy of Medicine’s Learning Health System Series defines a learning health system...

19 January 2017

Integrating Telemedicine Responsibly

Providers and patients alike view telemedicine as an increasingly important healthcare delivery modality. Per a recent article in Medical Economics, “How to balance telemedicine advances with ethics,” the American Telemedicine Association (ATA) reports that more than half of all U.S. hospitals use some form of telemedicine; and IHS Technology predicts the number of patients using telehealth services will jump from fewer than 350,000 in 2013 to 7 million in 2018.

But this modality can also be challenging to implement responsibly.

Telehealth Benefits

The dramatic growth of telemedicine is driven by its ability to further the goals of the “quadruple aim” framework for...

17 January 2017

Study Identifies Risk Factors for Congenital Heart Disease in Infants

A study in the Canadian Medical Association Journal identified the chronic conditions that may predispose women to give birth to infants with congenital heart disease, also known as congenital heart defects or CHD.

The study reviewed the Taiwan Maternal and Child Health Database’s records of 1,387,650 live births from 2004 to 2010. The researchers investigated three data sets including:

Birth Registrations data on the sociodemographic characteristics of live births Birth Notifications data on prenatal care and the lifestyles of pregnant women Medical claims data from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance program

The researchers found that...

12 January 2017

Research Suggests Discussing Opioid Risks With Patients Reduces Misuse

Patients who were counseled by their physicians about the long-term risks of abusing prescription opioid pills were significantly less likely to save those medications – a high-risk abuse behavior – according to a research brief published in the November/December 2016 issue of Annals of Family Medicine. 

The researchers analyzed data from two April 2015 random-digit-dial telephone surveys, both conducted by the Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health and The Boston Globe, of adults 18 and older. One survey targeted Massachusetts residents; the other was national in scope. The researchers restricted their analysis to data from respondents who reported having been prescribed...

10 January 2017

Retail Clinics Near EDs Do Not Decrease Low-Acuity ED Visits

The opening of retail clinics within a 10-minute drive of emergency departments (EDs) has not resulted in reduced ED utilization for low-acuity conditions such as influenza, urinary tract infections and earaches, according to a recent study by RAND Corporation researchers. The study was published in the Annals of Emergency Medicine, the peer-reviewed scientific journal for the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP).

The findings contradict the assertions of some healthcare experts and policymakers that increasing the number of retail clinics could reduce ED visits by patients with low-acuity conditions. The study notes that about 13.7% of all emergency department visits are for low-acuity...