Category Archives: Cost Savings

4 April 2017

AMSURG Joins with Healthcare Bluebook to Make Healthcare Shopping Easier

An early proponent of Healthcare Bluebook, AMSURG was proud to be at the March 14 launch of their new healthcare marketplace price and quality tool for consumers in Nashville. AMSURG President Phillip Clendenin spoke at the event, emphasizing the consumer benefits of this tool. “It’s easier for healthcare insiders to understand how to shop for healthcare,” said Clendenin. “But this tool turns all consumers into insiders.” 

HCBB demystifies health system pricing and quality ratings, helping consumers find high-quality care at a fair price. Through their new marketplace comparison tool, which is free to all Nashville healthcare consumers, the company plans to help the city’s nearly...

31 January 2017

Learning Health System (LHS) Pilot Saved Nationwide Children’s Hospital $1.36 Million in 12 Months

Researchers from Nationwide Children's Hospital and The Ohio State University (OSU) found that a learning health system (LHS) pilot program at Nationwide combining tailored electronic health records system entry, care coordinators and evidence-based clinical data and research reduced total inpatient days by 43%, reduced inpatient admission by 27%, reduced ER visits by 30% and reduced urgent care visits by 29% during the first year. Per a recent article in HealthLeaders Media, those reductions generated an impressive $1.36 million savings in health care costs during the 12-month period in 2010 and 2011.

The National Academy of Medicine’s Learning Health System Series defines a learning health system...

5 January 2017

Our 10 Most Popular Blog Posts of 2016

The most-read posts on the Sheridan blog in 2016 focused on key topics – ranging from the challenges involved in the transition to value-based care and this country’s physician burnout epidemic to exciting technology innovations and trends in clinical practice.

The 10 most popular posts from the past year are:

How to Manage the Burdens of Change on Physicians and Health Care Practitioners, a summary of Chief Quality Officer Dr. Gerald Maccioli’s presentation at the 2016 Health:Further Summit about the overwhelming burdens on providers created by current and planned changes to the U.S. health care landscape and strategies for managing them.

Sheridan’s 2016 Leadership...

14 December 2016

Using Icon-based Transport Labels to Cut Blood Product Waste and Save Money

Even simple, inexpensive changes can have a big impact on solving challenging problems. A great example is the University of Florida (UF) College of Medicine successful initiative that dramatically reduced blood product waste and saved the hospital nearly $20,000 in five months, just by replacing text-heavy instruction labels for blood transport coolers with intuitive, icon-based labels.

A multidisciplinary committee comprising blood bank staff, anesthesiology staff and operating room managers determined that a significant cause of operating room blood product waste was units that were stored and/or returned outside the required temperature range established by the American Association of Blood Banks (AABB), according to...

8 December 2016

McLaren Hospital’s CEO Discusses the Value of Sheridan’s Distributed Radiology Services

When William “Bill” Lawrence became CEO of McLaren Central Michigan Hospital eight years ago, he saw no significant clinical issues with the three-physician radiology group at the 118-bed acute-care hospital, per a new article in Radiology Today. He did, however, find problems typical of a hospital that size: slow turnaround times, lack of consistency and significant gaps in the radiology services and modalities offered. Lawrence turned to an old friend, radiology leader Frank Seidelmann, D.O., to ask for his thoughts on solutions that could improve McLaren’s radiology services at a reasonable cost. 

Both men had worked at the renowned Cleveland Clinic and had known each other for many...

19 September 2016

How Physicians, Hospitals and Health Systems Are Dealing With the U.S. Drug Shortage Crisis

The ongoing drug shortage crisis in the U.S. is sending prices for some medications skyrocketing, forcing hospitals and physicians to scramble for alternatives and threatening the safety of patients. These shortages have been causing major problems nationwide for several years, but the causes are complex and not easily fixed, and doctors, hospitals, health systems and acute-care facilities continue to struggle to find effective workarounds.

The number of drugs in short supply in this country has more than tripled in the past decade. Since 2012 when the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA) took effect, that number has decreased overall. Yet shortages of drugs commonly used for unscheduled acute...

14 September 2016

ESPN, Health Care Organizations Threatened by New Lower-Cost, More Flexible Alternatives

A recent article in Hospitals & Health Networks pointed out the striking similarities between the disruption of ESPN and the disruption facing health care organizations. ESPN’s dominant leadership position is being threatened by new lower-cost, more flexible entertainment media alternatives, forcing it to re-think its longstanding, wildly profitable business model. The value-based care imperative is causing equally dramatic disruption to the traditional health care delivery model.

ESPN, which styles itself “The Worldwide Leader in Sports,” has long dominated sports media and in 2012 was valued at $40B, making it the world’s most valuable media property. Since then, however, ESPN has...

27 July 2016

The Challenges of Staffing a Rural Hospital Successfully

Population health management is a challenging proposition in any location, but especially so in rural areas, which comprise nearly 20 percent of the U.S. population and more than 95 percent of the country’s land. Health care resources are more limited and the population is more spread out than in urban settings. The patient base at rural and nonurban hospitals also tends to be smaller, older, poorer, and less healthy than that of urban hospitals, which means there is little opportunity to mitigate financial risk. The inability to take advantage of the economies of scale enjoyed by urban healthcare systems affords little opportunity for cost reduction. Add in shrinking Medicare reimbursements, and it becomes...

21 July 2016

Key Considerations for Performing Outpatient Total Joint Replacements at Ambulatory Surgery Centers

According to a recent article in Becker’s ASC Review, orthopedic procedures, especially, total knee and hip replacement surgeries, are among the most popular surgical services performed at ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs). The publication interviewed Sheridan anesthesiologist Cameron Howard, M.D., who described some of the key considerations in doing these types of procedures as outpatient surgeries successfully.

Dr. Howard explained that although it is much more cost-effective to do these procedures on an outpatient basis, it is desirable for some patients – e.g., middle aged, non-obese, with no significant medical problems – but not for all. For example, an inpatient setting may be preferable for...

20 June 2016

Communication and Transparency in Lean Process Improvement

A recent article in Modern Healthcare discussed the importance of data transparency and communication in targeting process improvements effectively. One of the examples highlighted was the Project Zero campaign launched in 2011 by St. Luke’s Health System in Boise, Idaho to eliminate hospital-acquired infection in the orthopedic service line. By allowing orthopedic surgeons to routinely monitor the system's infection rate after knee and hip replacement surgeries, laminectomy procedures and spinal fusion surgeries, St. Luke’s was able to reduce the rate from 1.08 percent to 0.57 percent in two years. In addition to tracking data, effective communication and collaboration were key to success. Dr. Kevin Shea,...